​Paul probably died between 1780 and 1783 according to tax list appearances discussed elsewhere on this web site.  His eldest son George died in 1790 according to his estate file.  Paul’s youngest son Martin probably died between 1793 after the birth of his youngest son Paul in that year and before 1800 because he does not appear on the 1800 Federal Census.

In spite of these disappointing missing grave sites, I am grateful to have located and photographed as many cemeteries and grave stones as I have for my Yinger ancestors within the first four generations.  These three ancestors and others I have not been able to locate are indicated on the list that follows as “unknown” as to place of burial. 

Here then is a chronological list of the first four generations of the Yingers of York County Pennsylvania with links to the cemetery web pages where information about their specific locations is given:

FIRST GENERATION:

Johann Paul Jünger and his wife: burial location unknown.

SECOND GENERATION:

George Yinger and his wife Sophronia Broband Yinger: burial location unknown.

Anthony Yinger and his wife Magdalena Broband Yinger: Bear Family Cemetery.

Martin Yinger and his wife Catherine Grove Yinger: burial location unknown.

THIRD GENERATION:

George and Sophronia Broband Yinger’s children:

Ann (Nancy) Yinger Fetrow and her husband John Fetrow: Fetrow Cemetery.

Anthony and Magdalena Broband Yinger’s children:

1.     Jacob Yinger: Bear family Cemetery

2.     Elisabeth Yinger: Bear family Cemetery.

3.     George Yinger and wife Margaret Creamer Yinger: Unknown and Fishing Creek Salem Cemetery.

4.     Mary Yinger Fetrow wife of David Fetrow: burial location unknown.

5.     John Yinger and wife Rebecca: Fishing Creek Salem Cemetery.

6.     Martin Yinger: Bear family Cemetery.

7.     Nancy Yinger: Yocumtown Church of God Cemetery.

8.     Catherine Yinger Keister and husband Henry G. Keister: Yocumtown Church of God Cemetery.

9.     Sallie (Sarah) Yinger: Yocumtown Church of God Cemetery.

Martin and Catherine Grove Yinger’s children:

1.     Samuel Yinger: burial location unknown.

2.     Paul Yinger and wife Christine Snyder Yinger: Manchester Union Cemetery.

FOURTH GENERATION:

In the third generation of Yingers of York County Pennsylvania only three males had families.  Johann Paul Jünger’s eldest son George and his wife Sophronia Broband Yinger only had one child, a daughter named Ann (Nancy) who married a John Fetrow.  Therefore no later Yinger male descendents come from George Yinger.

Although Johann Paul Jünger’s middle son Anthony and his wife Magdalena Broband Yinger had a large family including four sons, only two of those sons married and had families with male children. 

Anthony and Magdalena Broband Yinger's son George married a woman named Margaret and they had the following children:

1.     Jacob Yinger: Paddletown Cemetery.

2.     George C. Yinger: Harrisburg Cemetery, Dauphin County.

3.     Daughter1(George) Yinger: burial location unknown.

4.     Anthony Yinger: St. Matthew Lutheran Church Cemetery, Cumberland County.

5.     Joseph C. Yinger: Mt. Olivet Cemetery, New Cumberland.

6.     Henry C. Yinger: Smoketown/Goldsboro/Plainfield Cemetery.

7.     Daughter2(George) Yinger: burial location unknown.

Anthony and Magdalena Broband Yinger’s son John married a woman named Rebecca and they had the following children:

1.     Daughter1(John) Yinger: burial location unknown.

2.     William Yinger: Crossroads Union Church Cemetery.

3.     Daughter2(John) Yinger: burial location unknown.

4.     Harriet Yinger: burial location unknown.

5.     Charles Yinger: Fishing Creek Salem Cemetery.

6.     Rebecca Yinger: burial location unknown.

7.     John Yinger: Millbrook Cemetery in Clinton Township of Wayne County, Ohio.

8.     Elmira Yinger: burial location unknown.

9.     Mary Yinger: burial location unknown.

 

Johann Paul Jünger’s youngest son Martin and his wife Catherine Grove Yinger had two sons, Samuel and Paul Yinger.  However, only Paul was married because Samuel died in young adulthood as discussed elsewhere in this web site. 

Paul married Christine Snyder and had the following children:

1.     Jacob S. Yinger: Manchester Union Cemetery.

2.     Samuel Yinger: Manchester Old Mennonite Cemetery.

3.     Elizabeth Yinger: burial location unknown.

4.     John S. Yinger: Manchester Lutheran Cemetery.

5.     Daniel S. Yinger: Silver Spring Cemetery, Lancaster County.

6.     Charles Henry Yinger: Manchester Lutheran Cemetery.

7.     William Yinger: Manchester Union Cemetery.

8.     Paul S. Yinger: Mount Bethel Cemetery, Columbia, Lancaster County.

9,     Abraham Yinger: Cold Harbor Battlefield Cemetery, Virginia.

10.    Ann Maria Yinger Shambaugh:  burial location unknown.

11.    Samuel Yinger (2nd): Manchester Union Cemetery.

12.    George S. Yinger: Prospect Hill Cemetery.

This concludes the enumeration of the fourth generation of my Yinger ancestors of York County Pennsylvania.  For my siblings, children and first cousins on the Yinger side of my family tree I present the following direct paternal line of descent for our Yinger ancestors:

FIRST GENERATION:

Johann Paul Jünger and his wife: burial location unknown.

SECOND GENERATION:

Anthony Yinger and his wife Magdalena Broband Yinger: Bear Family Cemetery, Yocumtown, PA.

THIRD GENERATION:

George Yinger and wife Margaret Creamer Yinger: Unknown and Fishing Creek Salem Cemetery, Yocumtown, PA.

FOURTH GENERATION:

Jacob Yinger and his wife Elizabeth Koch Yinger: Paddletown Cemetery, Newberrytown, PA.

FIFTH GENERATION:

George K. and Hannah Updegraff Yinger: Paddletown Cemetery, Newberrytown, PA.

SIXTH GENERATION:

David U. Yinger and Edith May Davis: Terre Hill Cemetery, Lancaster County, PA and Mt. Olivet Cemetery, New Cumberland, PA

SEVENTH GENERATION:

Vernon H. and Anna Frantz Hocker Yinger: Westminster Cemetery, Carlisle, PA.

EIGHTH GENERATION:

Gerald A. and Edna Baty Yinger: Harpeth Hills Memory Gardens, Nashville, Tennessee and still living.

The following is a list of the cemeteries I have visited and documented for the Yinger ancestors listed above:

Baer Cemetery

Fetrow Cemetery

Fishing Creek Salem Cemetery

Yocumtown Church of God Cemetery

Paddletown Cemetery

Harrisburg Cemetery

St. Matthew Lutheran Church Cemetery

Mt. Olivet Cemetery

Crossroads Church Cemetery

Smoketown/Goldsboro/Plainfield Cemetery

Manchester Union Cemetery

Manchester Old Mennonite Cemetery

Manchester Lutheran Cemetery

Silver Spring Cemetery

Mount Bethel Cemetery

Prospect Hill Cemetery

Terre Hill Cemetery

Westminster Cemetery Carlisle

Harpeth Hills Memory Gardens​

​ Yinger Family Cemetery and Grave Site Introduction

One of the distinguishing characteristics of the genealogist is a heightened interest, some would say obsession, with cemeteries.  Early in my Yinger family history project I was drawn to discover, photograph and document the grave sites where my Yinger ancestors are buried.  Since the early generations of Yingers were born and died in York County Pennsylvania, that area was my initial focus.

However, my search expanded to include other cemeteries in adjoining counties including Cumberland, Dauphin and Lancaster Counties when Yinger ancestors were traced to those counties after emigrating from York County.  Nevertheless, during the first four generations, most of my Yinger ancestors lived out their lives, died and were buried in York County.

Before the Civil War, embalming was not practiced in America.  Therefore, most people were buried shortly after they died very near the place they were living at the time of their death.  As a result, finding the grave site of an ancestor who died prior to the 1860s substantially confirms where they had been living at the time of their death. 

I have elected to limit my focus on identifying and documenting the cemeteries and grave sites of the first four generations of my York County Pennsylvania ancestors.  Particular emphasis within this parameter is also placed on the males because their Yinger surname remains intact after marriage making them easier to track.  However, whenever possible I have also documented female Yinger ancestors within the first four generations as well.

My decision to stop the exhaustive search with the fourth generation for my Yinger ancestors in America was made because to carry it beyond that generation into the fifth generation would be a huge but not impossible challenge.  The fourth generation of Yingers from York County Pennsylvania were born between 1817 and 1842.  They died generally in the late 1800s to early 1900s. 

As a result, those descendants alive today who wish to connect back to this core group of common Yinger ancestors should be able to do so easily through inquiry of their parents and grandparents about their Yinger family roots combined with census record searches.  Many libraries provide free access to ancestry.com databases which include U.S. Federal census images with search capabilities through the 1940 census.

In the course of finding and documenting this defined early group of Yinger ancestors, often Yinger descendants of theirs beyond the fourth generation where easily located and photographed or otherwise documented.  Usually those later generation Yingers were found buried near their fourth generation parents and grandparents.  I have included those Yinger descendant grave sites as well within the relevant cemetery page.

I have also elected to identify and document the cemeteries and grave sites where my direct paternal Yinger ancestors are buried beyond the fourth generation. This extension beyond the fourth generation includes all of my direct Yinger ancestors up to and including my father Gerald A. (Bud) Yinger who died on January 31, 2003. 

I have been fortunate in locating most of the cemeteries of my Yinger family ancestors through the fourth generation.  However, I have been unsuccessful in locating the grave sites for a handful of those ancestors.  Of particular disappointment to me was my failure to locate the burial places of my immigrant ancestor Johann Paul Jünger and two of his three sons, George and Martin. 

All of these Yinger ancestors died before 1800.  They may have been buried with markers made of wood.  They may have been laid to rest in a family cemetery on the Broband/Yinger/Fetrow family farm that has since been lost.  They may have been buried in one of the early cemeteries in northern York County whose grave stones have eroded to the point of being illegible.

One such cemetery is the “Old Lutheran Cemetery” also known as “Bat Pen” near Lewisberry in northern York County.  Here is a picture I took of that cemetery which depicts the significant stage of erosion of some of the grave stones:​